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Papers

  • Simple and Effective Multi-Paragraph Reading Comprehension
    Christopher Clark and Matt Gardner ACL 2018

    We consider the problem of adapting neural paragraph-level question answering models to the case where entire documents are given as input. Our proposed solution trains models to produce well calibrated confidence scores for their results on individual paragraphs. We sample multiple paragraphs from the documents during training, and use a sharednormalization training objective that encourages the model to produce globally correct output. We combine this method with a stateof-the-art pipeline for training models on document QA data. Experiments demonstrate strong performance on several document QA datasets. Overall, we are able to achieve a score of 71.3 F1 on the web portion of TriviaQA, a large improvement from the 56.7 F1 of the previous best system. Less

  • Ultra-Fine Entity Typing
    Eunsol Choi, Omer Levy, Yejin Choi and Luke Zettlemoyer ACL 2018

    We introduce a new entity typing task: given a sentence with an entity mention, the goal is to predict a set of free-form phrases (e.g. skyscraper, songwriter, or criminal) that describe appropriate types for the target entity. This formulation allows us to use a new type of distant supervision at large scale: head words, which indicate the type of the noun phrases they appear in. We show that these ultra-fine types can be crowd-sourced, and introduce new evaluation sets that are much more diverse and fine-grained than existing benchmarks. We present a model that can predict open types, and is trained using a multitask objective that pools our new head-word supervision with prior supervision from entity linking. Experimental results demonstrate that our model is effective in predicting entity types at varying granularity; it achieves state of the art performance on an existing fine-grained entity typing benchmark, and sets baselines for our newly-introduced datasets. Less

  • Learning to Write with Cooperative Discriminators
    Ari Holtzman, Jan Buys, Maxwell Forbes, Antoine Bosselut, David Golub and Yejin Choi ACL 2018

    Despite their local fluency, long-form text generated from RNNs is often generic, repetitive, and even self-contradictory. We propose a unified learning framework that collectively addresses all the above issues by composing a committee of discriminators that can guide a base RNN generator towards more globally coherent generations. More concretely, discriminators each specialize in a different principle of communication, such as Grice’s maxims, and are collectively combined with the base RNN generator through a composite decoding objective. Human evaluation demonstrates that text generated by our model is preferred over that of baselines by a large margin, significantly enhancing the overall coherence, style, and information of the generations. Less

  • Event2Mind: Commonsense Inference on Events, Intents, and Reactions
    Maarten Sap, Hannah Rashkin, Emily Allaway, Noah A. Smith and Yejin Choi ACL 2018

    We investigate a new commonsense inference task: given an event described in a short free-form text (“X drinks coffee in the morning”), a system reasons about the likely intents (“X wants to stay awake”) and reactions (“X feels alert”) of the event’s participants. To support this study, we construct a new crowdsourced corpus of 25,000 event phrases covering a diverse range of everyday events and situations. We report baseline performance on this task, demonstrating that neural encoder-decoder models can successfully compose embedding representations of previously unseen events and reason about the likely intents and reactions of the event participants. In addition, we demonstrate how commonsense inference on people’s intents and reactions can help unveil the implicit gender inequality prevalent in modern movie scripts. Less

  • Modeling Naive Psychology of Characters in Simple Commonsense Stories
    Hannah Rashkin, Antoine Bosselut, Maarten Sap, Kevin Knight and Yejin Choi ACL 2018

    Understanding a narrative requires reading between the lines and reasoning about the unspoken but obvious implications about events and people’s mental states — a capability that is trivial for humans but remarkably hard for machines. To facilitate research addressing this challenge, we introduce a new annotation framework to explain naive psychology of story characters as fully-specified chains of mental states with respect to motivations and emotional reactions. Our work presents a new largescale dataset with rich low-level annotations and establishes baseline performance on several new tasks, suggesting avenues for future research. Less

  • Adversarial Training for Textual Entailment with Knowledge-Guided Examples
    Tushar Khot, Ashish Sabharwal and Dongyeop Kang ACL 2018

    We consider the problem of learning textual entailment models with limited supervision (5K-10K training examples), and present two complementary approaches for it. First, we propose knowledge-guided adversarial example generators for incorporating large lexical resources in entailment models via only a handful of rule templates. Second, to make the entailment model—a discriminator—more robust, we propose the first GAN-style approach for training it using a natural language example generator that iteratively adjusts based on the discriminator’s performance. We demonstrate effectiveness using two entailment datasets, where the proposed methods increase accuracy by 4.7% on SciTail and by 2.8% on a 1% training sub-sample of SNLI. Notably, even a single hand-written rule, negate, improves the accuracy on the negation examples in SNLI by 6.1%. Less

  • Extracting Scientific Figures with Distantly Supervised Neural Networks
    Noah Siegel, Nicholas Lourie, Russell Power and Waleed Ammar JCDL 2018

    Non-textual components such as charts, diagrams and tables provide key information in many scientific documents, but the lack of large labeled datasets has impeded the development of data-driven methods for scientific figure extraction. In this paper, we induce high-quality training labels for the task of figure extraction in a large number of scientific documents, with no human intervention. To accomplish this we leverage the auxiliary data provided in two large web collections of scientific documents (arXiv and PubMed) to locate figures and their associated captions in the rasterized PDF. We share the resulting dataset of over 5.5 million induced labels---4,000 times larger than the previous largest figure extraction dataset---with an average precision of 96.8%, to enable the development of modern data-driven methods for this task. We use this dataset to train a deep neural network for end-to-end figure detection, yielding a model that can be more easily extended to new domains compared to previous work. The model was successfully deployed in Semantic Scholar, a large-scale academic search engine, and used to extract figures in 13 million scientific documents. A demo of our system is available at labs.semanticscholar.org/deepfigures/. Less

  • VISIR: Visual and Semantic Image Label Refinement
    Sreyasi Nag Chowdhury, Niket Tandon, Hakan Ferhatosmanoglu, Gerhard Weikum WSDM 2018

    The social media explosion has populated the Internet with a wealth of images. There are two existing paradigms for image retrieval: 1)content-based image retrieval (BIR), which has traditionally used visual features for similarity search (e.g., SIFT features), and 2) tag-based image retrieval (TBIR), which has relied on user tagging (e.g., Flickr tags). CBIR now gains semantic expressiveness by advances in deep-learning-based detection of visual labels. TBIR benefits from query-and-click logs to automatically infer more informative labels. However, learning-based tagging still yields noisy labels and is restricted to concrete objects, missing out on generalizations and abstractions. Click-based tagging is limited to terms that appear in the textual context of an image or in queries that lead to a click. This paper addresses the above limitations by semantically refining and expanding the labels suggested by learning-based object detection. We consider the semantic coherence between the labels for different objects, leverage lexical and commonsense knowledge, and cast the label assignment into a constrained optimization problem solved by an integer linear program. Experiments show that our method, called VISIR, improves the quality of the state-of-the-art visual labeling tools like LSDA and YOLO. Less

  • Neural Poetry Translation
    Marjan Ghazvininejad, Yejin Choi and Kevin Knight NAACL 2018

    We present the first neural poetry translation system. Unlike previous works that often fail to produce any translation for fixed rhyme and rhythm patterns, our system always translates a source text to an English poem. Human evaluation ranks translation quality as acceptable 78.2% of the time. Less

  • Discourse-Aware Neural Rewards For Coherent Text Generation
    Antoine Bosselut, Asli Celikyilmaz, Xiaodong He, Jianfeng Gao, Po-Sen Huang and Yejin Choi NAACL 2018

    In this paper, we investigate the use of discourse-aware rewards with reinforcement learning to guide a model to generate long, coherent text. In particular, we propose to learn neural rewards to model cross-sentence ordering as a means to approximate desired discourse structure. Empirical results demonstrate that a generator trained with the learned reward produces more coherent and less repetitive text than models trained with crossentropy or with reinforcement learning with commonly used scores as rewards. Less