Menu
Viewing 38 papers from 2019
Clear all
    • CVPR 2019
      Sachin Mehta, Mohammad Rastegari, Linda Shapiro, Hannaneh Hajishirzi

      We introduce a light-weight, power efficient, and general purpose convolutional neural network, ESPNetv2 , for modeling visual and sequential data. Our network uses group point-wise and depth-wise dilated separable convolutions to learn representations from a large effective receptive field with fewer FLOPs and parameters. The performance of our network is evaluated on three different tasks: (1) object classification, (2) semantic segmentation, and (3) language modeling. Experiments on these tasks, including image classification on the ImageNet and language modeling on the PenTree bank dataset, demonstrate the superior performance of our method over the state-of-the-art methods. Our network has better generalization properties than ShuffleNetv2 when tested on the MSCOCO multi-object classification task and the Cityscapes urban scene semantic segmentation task. Our experiments show that ESPNetv2 is much more power efficient than existing state-of-the-art efficient methods including ShuffleNets and MobileNets. Our code is open-source and available at https://github.com/sacmehta/ESPNetv2.

      Less More
    • CVPR 2019
      Mohammad Mahdi Derakhshani, Saeed Masoudnia, Amir Hossein Shaker, Omid Mersa, Mohammad Amin Sadeghi, Mohammad Rastegari, Babak N. Araabi

      We present a simple and effective learning technique that significantly improves mAP of YOLO object detectors without compromising their speed. During network training, we carefully feed in localization information. We excite certain activations in order to help the network learn to better localize. In the later stages of training, we gradually reduce our assisted excitation to zero. We reached a new state-of-the-art in the speed-accuracy trade-off. Our technique improves the mAP of YOLOv2 by 3.8% and mAP of YOLOv3 by 2.2% on MSCOCO dataset. This technique is inspired from curriculum learning. It is simple and effective and it is applicable to most single-stage object detectors.

      Less More
    • CVPR 2019
      Unnat Jain, Luca Weihs, Eric Kolve, Mohammad Rastegari, Svetlana Lazebnik, Ali Farhadi, Alexander Schwing, Aniruddha Kembhavi

      Collaboration is a necessary skill to perform tasks that are beyond one agent's capabilities. Addressed extensively in both conventional and modern AI, multi-agent collaboration has often been studied in the context of simple grid worlds. We argue that there are inherently visual aspects to collaboration which should be studied in visually rich environments. A key element in collaboration is communication that can be either explicit, through messages, or implicit, through perception of the other agents and the visual world. Learning to collaborate in a visual environment entails learning (1) to perform the task, (2) when and what to communicate, and (3) how to act based on these communications and the perception of the visual world. In this paper we study the problem of learning to collaborate directly from pixels in AI2-THOR and demonstrate the benefits of explicit and implicit modes of communication to perform visual tasks.

      Less More
    • OK-VQA: A Visual Question Answering Benchmark Requiring External Knowledge
      CVPR 2019
      Kenneth Marino, Mohammad Rastegari, Ali Farhadi, Roozbeh Mottaghi

      Visual Question Answering (VQA) in its ideal form lets us study reasoning in the joint space of vision and language and serves as a proxy for the AI task of scene understanding. However, most VQA benchmarks to date are focused on questions such as simple counting, visual attributes, and object detection that do not require reasoning or knowledge beyond what is in the image. In this paper, we address the task of knowledge-based visual question answering and provide a benchmark, called OK-VQA, where the image content is not sufficient to answer the questions, encouraging methods that rely on external knowledge resources. Our new dataset includes more than 14,000 questions that require external knowledge to answer. We show that the performance of the state-of-the-art VQA models degrades drastically in this new setting. Our analysis shows that our knowledge-based VQA task is diverse, difficult, and large compared to previous knowledge-based VQA datasets. We hope that this dataset enables researchers to open up new avenues for research in this domain.

      Less More
    • CVPR 2019
      Huiyu Wang, Aniruddha Kembhavi, Ali Farhadi, Alan Loddon Yuille, Mohammad Rastegari

      Scale variation has been a challenge from traditional to modern approaches in computer vision. Most solutions to scale issues have similar theme: a set of intuitive and manually designed policies that are generic and fixed (e.g. SIFT or feature pyramid). We argue that the scale policy should be learned from data. In this paper, we introduce ELASTIC, a simple, efficient and yet very effective approach to learn instance-specific scale policy from data. We formulate the scaling policy as a non-linear function inside the network’s structure that (a) is learned from data, (b) is instance specific, (c) does not add extra computation, and (d) can be applied on any network architecture. We applied ELASTIC to several state-of-the-art network architectures and showed consistent improvement without extra (sometimes even lower) computation on ImageNet classification, MSCOCO multi-label classification, and PASCAL VOC semantic segmentation. Our results show major improvement for images with scale challenges e.g. images with several small objects or objects with large scale variations. Our code and models will be publicly available soon.

      Less More
    • CVPR 2019
      Yao-Hung Tsai, Santosh Divvala, Louis-Philippe Morency, Ruslan Salakhutdinov and Ali Farhadi

      Visual relationship reasoning is a crucial yet challenging task for understanding rich interactions across visual concepts. For example, a relationship {man, open, door} involves a complex relation {open} between concrete entities {man, door}. While much of the existing work has studied this problem in the context of still images, understanding visual relationships in videos has received limited attention. Due to their temporal nature, videos enable us to model and reason about a more comprehensive set of visual relationships, such as those requiring multiple (temporal) observations (e.g., {man, lift up, box} vs. {man, put down, box}), as well as relationships that are often correlated through time (e.g., {woman, pay, money} followed by {woman, buy, coffee}). In this paper, we construct a Conditional Random Field on a fully-connected spatio-temporal graph that exploits the statistical dependency between relational entities spatially and temporally. We introduce a novel gated energy function parametrization that learns adaptive relations conditioned on visual observations. Our model optimization is computationally efficient, and its space computation complexity is significantly amortized through our proposed parameterization. Experimental results on benchmark video datasets (ImageNet Video and Charades) demonstrate state-of-the-art performance across three standard relationship reasoning tasks: Detection, Tagging, and Recognition.

      Less More
    • CVPR 2019
      Mitchell Wortsman, Kiana Ehsani, Mohammad Rastegari, Ali Farhadi, Roozbeh Mottaghi

      Learning is an inherently continuous phenomenon. When humans learn a new task there is no explicit distinction between training and inference. After we learn a task, we keep learning about it while performing the task. What we learn and how we learn it varies during different stages of learning. Learning how to learn and adapt is a key property that enables us to generalize effortlessly to new settings. This is in contrast with conventional settings in machine learning where a trained model is frozen during inference. In this paper we study the problem of learning to learn at both training and inference time in the context of visual navigation. A fundamental challenge in navigation is generalization to unseen scenes. In this paper we propose a self-adaptive visual navigation method (SAVN) which learns to adapt to new environments without any explicit supervision. Our solution is a meta-reinforcement learning approach where an agent learns a self-supervised interaction loss that encourages effective navigation. Our experiments, performed in the AI2-THOR framework, show major improvements in both success rate and SPL for visual navigation in novel scenes.

      Less More
    • CVPR 2019
      Rowan Zellers, Yonatan Bisk, Ali Farhadi, Yejin Choi

      Visual understanding goes well beyond object recognition. With one glance at an image, we can effortlessly imagine the world beyond the pixels: for instance, we can infer people’s actions, goals, and mental states. While this task is easy for humans, it is tremendously difficult for today’s vision systems, requiring higher-order cognition and commonsense reasoning about the world. In this paper, we formalize this task as Visual Commonsense Reasoning. In addition to answering challenging visual questions expressed in natural language, a model must provide a rationale explaining why its answer is true. We introduce a new dataset, VCR, consisting of 290k multiple choice QA problems derived from 110k movie scenes. The key recipe to generating non-trivial and high-quality problems at scale is Adversarial Matching, a new approach to transform rich annotations into multiple choice questions with minimal bias. To move towards cognition-level image understanding, we present a new reasoning engine, called Recognition to Cognition Networks (R2C), that models the necessary layered inferences for grounding, contextualization, and reasoning. Experimental results show that while humans find VCR easy (over 90% accuracy), state-of-theart models struggle (∼45%). Our R2C helps narrow this gap (∼65%); still, the challenge is far from solved, and we provide analysis that suggests avenues for future work.

      Less More
    • NAACL-HLT 2019
      Xinya Du, Bhavana Dalvi Mishra, Niket Tandon, Antoine Bosselut, Wen-tau Yih, Peter Clark, Claire Cardie

      Our goal is procedural text comprehension, namely tracking how the properties of entities (e.g., their location) change with time given a procedural text (e.g., a paragraph about photosynthesis, a recipe). This task is challenging as the world is changing throughout the text, and despite recent advances, current systems still struggle with this task. Our approach is to leverage the fact that, for many procedural texts, multiple independent descriptions are readily available, and that predictions from them should be consistent (label consistency). We present a new learning framework that leverages label consistency during training, allowing consistency bias to be built into the model. Evaluation on a standard benchmark dataset for procedural text, ProPara (Dalvi et al., 2018), shows that our approach significantly improves prediction performance (F1) over prior state-of-the-art systems.

      Less More
    • NAACL-HLT 2019
      Dheeru Dua, Yizhong Wang, Pradeep Dasigi, Gabriel Stanovsky, Sameer Singh, Matt Gardner

      Reading comprehension has recently seen rapid progress, with systems matching humans on the most popular datasets for the task. However, a large body of work has highlighted the brittleness of these systems, showing that there is much work left to be done. We introduce a new English reading comprehension benchmark, DROP, which requires Discrete Reasoning Over the content of Paragraphs. In this crowdsourced, adversarially-created, 96k-question benchmark, a system must resolve references in a question, perhaps to multiple input positions, and perform discrete operations over them (such as addition, counting, or sorting). These operations require a much more comprehensive understanding of the content of paragraphs than what was necessary for prior datasets. We apply state-of-the-art methods from both the reading comprehension and semantic parsing literature on this dataset and show that the best systems only achieve 32.7% F1 on our generalized accuracy metric, while expert human performance is 96.0%. We additionally present a new model that combines reading comprehension methods with simple numerical reasoning to achieve 47.0% F1.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Nelson F. Liu, Roy Schwartz, Noah Smith

      Several datasets have recently been constructed to expose brittleness in models trained on existing benchmarks. While model performance on these challenge datasets is significantly lower compared to the original benchmark, it is unclear what particular weaknesses they reveal. For example, a challenge dataset may be difficult because it targets phenomena that current models cannot capture, or because it simply exploits blind spots in a model's specific training set. We introduce inoculation by fine-tuning, a new analysis method for studying challenge datasets by exposing models (the metaphorical patient) to a small amount of data from the \term dataset (a metaphorical pathogen) and assessing how well they can adapt. We apply our method to analyze the NLI "stress tests" (Naike et al., 2018) and the Adversarial SQuAD dataset (Jia and Liang, 2017). We show that after slight exposure, some of these datasets are no longer challenging, while others remain difficult. Our results indicate that failures on challenge datasets may lead to very different conclusions about models, training datasets, and the challenge datasets themselves.

      Less More
    • Award Best Resource Paper
      NAACL 2019
      Alon Talmor, Jonathan Herzig, Nicholas Lourie, Jonathan Berant

      When answering a question, people often draw upon their rich world knowledge in addition to the particular context. Recent work has focused primarily on answering questions given some relevant document or context, and required very little general background. To investigate question answering with prior knowledge, we present COMMONSENSEQA: a challenging new dataset for commonsense question answering. To capture common sense beyond associations, we extract from CONCEPTNET (Speer et al., 2017) multiple target concepts that have the same semantic relation to a single source concept. Crowd-workers are asked to author multiple-choice questions that mention the source concept and discriminate in turn between each of the target concepts. This encourages workers to create questions with complex semantics that often require prior knowledge. We create 12,247 questions through this procedure and demonstrate the difficulty of our task with a large number of strong baselines. Our best baseline is based on BERT-large (Devlin et al., 2018) and obtains 56% accuracy, well below human performance, which is 89%. LESS

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Amit Mor-Yosef, Ido Dagan, Yoav Goldberg

      Data-to-text generation can be conceptually divided into two parts: ordering and structuring the information (planning), and generating fluent language describing the information (realization). Modern neural generation systems conflate these two steps into a single end-to-end differentiable system. We propose to split the generation process into a symbolic text-planning stage that is faithful to the input, followed by a neural generation stage that focuses only on realization. For training a plan-to-text generator, we present a method for matching reference texts to their corresponding text plans. For inference time, we describe a method for selecting high-quality text plans for new inputs. We implement and evaluate our approach on the WebNLG benchmark. Our results demonstrate that decoupling text planning from neural realization indeed improves the system's reliability and adequacy while maintaining fluent output. We observe improvements both in BLEU scores and in manual evaluations. Another benefit of our approach is the ability to output diverse realizations of the same input, paving the way to explicit control over the generated text structure.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Noa Yehezkel, Jacob Goldberger, Yoav Goldberg

      The problem of learning to translate between two vector spaces given a set of aligned points arises in several application areas of NLP. Current solutions assume that the lexicon which defines the alignment pairs is noise-free. We consider the case where the set of aligned points is allowed to contain an amount of noise, in the form of incorrect lexicon pairs and show that this arises in practice by analyzing the edited dictionaries after the cleaning process. We demonstrate that such noise substantially degrades the accuracy of the learned translation when using current methods. We propose a model that accounts for noisy pairs. This is achieved by introducing a generative model with a compatible iterative EM algorithm. The algorithm jointly learns the noise level in the lexicon, finds the set of noisy pairs, and learns the mapping between the spaces. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm on two alignment problems: bilingual word embedding translation, and mapping between diachronic embedding spaces for recovering the semantic shifts of words across time periods.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Arman Cohan, Waleed Ammar, Madeleine van Zuylen, Field Cady

      Identifying the intent of a citation in scientific papers (e.g., background information, use of methods, comparing results) is critical for machine reading of individual publications and automated analysis of the scientific literature. We propose a multitask approach to incorporate information in the structure of scientific papers for effective classification of citation intents. Our model achieves a new state-of-the-art on an existing ACL anthology dataset with a 13.3% absolute increase in F1 score, without relying on external linguistic resources or hand-engineered features as done in existing methods. In addition, we introduce a new dataset of citation intents which is more than five times larger and covers multiple scientific domains compared with existing datasets.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Or Gorodissky, Yoav Chai, Yotam Gil, Jonathan Berant

      We show that a neural network can learn to imitate the optimization process performed by white-box attack in a much more efficient manner. We train a black-box attack through this imitation process and show our attack is 19x-39x faster than the white-box attack and also that we can perform a black-box attack against Google Perspective API - in a task for detecting toxic language we change the prediction of the classifier for 42% of the input examples.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Iz Beltagy, Kyle Lo, Waleed Ammar

      In relation extraction with distant supervision, noisy labels make it difficult to train quality models. Previous neural models addressed this problem using an attention mechanism that attends to sentences that are likely to express the relations. We improve such models by combining the distant supervision data with an additional directly-supervised data, which we use as supervision for the attention weights. We find that joint training on both types of supervision leads to a better model because it improves the model's ability to identify noisy sentences. In addition, we find that sigmoidal attention weights with max pooling achieves better performance over the commonly used weighted average attention in this setup. Our proposed method achieves a new state-of-the-art result on the widely used FB-NYT dataset.

      Less More
    • Iterative Search for Weakly Supervised Semantic Parsing
      NAACL 2019
      Pradeep Dasigi, Matt Gardner, Shikhar Murty, Luke Zettlemoyer, Ed Hovy

      Training semantic parsers from question-answer pairs typically involves searching over an exponentially large space of logical forms, and an unguided search can easily be misled by spurious logical forms that coincidentally evaluate to the correct answer. We propose a novel iterative training algorithm that alternates between searching for consistent logical forms and maximizing the marginal likelihood of the retrieved ones, while gradually increasing the complexity of the logical forms being searched for. This training scheme lets us start from a small set of simple yet precise logical forms, and iteratively train models that provide guidance to subsequent ones that search for more complex logical forms, thus effectively dealing with the problem of spuriousness. We evaluate these techniques on two hard datasets: WikiTableQuestions (WTQ) and Cornell Natural Language Visual Reasoning (NLVR), and show that our training algorithm outperforms the previous best systems, on WTQ in a comparable setting, and on NLVR with significantly less supervision.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Yi Luan, Dave Wadden, Luheng He, Mari Ostendorf, Hannaneh Hajishirzi

      We introduce a general framework for several information extraction tasks that share span representations using dynamically constructed span graphs. The graphs are dynamically constructed by selecting the most confident entity spans and linking these nodes with confidence-weighted relation types and coreferences. The dynamic span graph allows coreference and relation type confidences to propagate through the graph to iteratively refine the span representations. This is unlike previous multitask frameworks for information extraction in which the only interaction between tasks is in the shared first-layer LSTM. Our framework significantly outperforms state-of-the-art on multiple information extraction tasks across multiple datasets reflecting different domains. We further observe that the span enumeration approach is good at detecting nested span entities, with significant F1 score improvement on the ACE dataset.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Rik Koncel-Kedziorski, Dhanush Bekal, Yi Luan, Mirella Lapata, Hannaneh Hajishirzi

      Generating texts which express complex ideas spanning multiple sentences requires a structured representation of their content (document plan), but these representations are prohibitively expensive to manually produce. In this work, we address the problem of generating coherent multi-sentence texts from the output of an information extraction system, and in particular a knowledge graph. Graphical knowledge representations are ubiquitous in computing, but pose a significant challenge for text generation techniques due to their non-hierarchical nature, collapsing of long-distance dependencies, and structural variety. We demonstrate how attention-based models for graph encoding can leverage the relational structure of such knowledge graphs without imposing linearization or hierarchical constraints. Incorporating these models into an encoder-decoder setup, we provide a new end-to-end trainable system for graph-to-text generation that we apply to the domain of scientific text. Automatic and human evaluations show that our technique produces more informative texts which exhibit better document structure than competitive encoder-decoder methods.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Harsh Trivedi, Heeyoung Kwon, Tushar Khot, Ashish Sabharwal, Niranjan Balasubramanian

      Question Answering (QA) naturally reduces to an entailment problem, namely, verifying whether some text entails the answer to a question. However, for multi-hop QA tasks, which require reasoning with multiple sentences, it remains unclear how best to utilize entailment models pre-trained on large scale datasets such as SNLI, which are based on sentence pairs.

      We introduce Multee, a general architecture that can effectively use entailment models for multi-hop QA tasks. Multee uses (i) a local module that helps locate important sentences, thereby avoiding distracting information, and (ii) a global module that aggregates information by effectively incorporating importance weights. Importantly, we show that both modules can use entailment functions pre-trained on large scale NLI datasets. We evaluate performance on MultiRC and OpenBookQA, two multihop QA datasets. When using an entailment function pre-trained on NLI datasets, Multee outperforms QA models trained only on the target QA datasets and the OpenAI transformer models.

      Less More
    • MathQA: Towards Interpretable Math Word Problem Solving with Operation-Based Formalisms
      NAACL 2019
      Aida Amini, Saadia Gabriel, Yejin Choi, Hannaneh Hajishirzi

      We introduce a large-scale dataset of math word problems and an interpretable neural math problem solver by learning to map problems to their operation programs. Due to annotation challenges, current datasets in this domain have been either relatively small in scale or did not offer precise operational annotations over diverse problem types. We introduce a new representation language to model operation programs corresponding to each math problem that aim to improve both the performance and the interpretability of the learned models. Using this representation language, we significantly enhance the AQuA dataset with fully-specified operational programs. We additionally introduce a neural sequence-to-program model with automatic problem categorization. Our experiments show improvements over competitive baselines in our dataset as well as the AQuA dataset. The results are still significantly lower than human performance, indicating that the dataset poses new challenges for future research. Our dataset is available at: https://math-qa.github.io/math-QA/.

      Less More
    • Benchmarking Hierarchical Script Knowledge
      NAACL 2019
      Yonatan Bisk, Jan Buys, Karl Pichotta, Yejin Choi
    • NAACL 2019
      Jesse Thomason, Daniel Gordan, Yonatan Bisk

      Language-and-vision navigation and question answering (QA) are exciting AI tasks situated at the intersection of natural language understanding, computer vision, and robotics. Researchers from all of these fields have begun creating datasets and model architectures for these domains. It is, however, not always clear if strong performance is due to advances in multimodal reasoning or if models are learning to exploit biases and artifacts of the data. We present single modality models and explore the linguistic, visual, and structural biases of these benchmarks. We find that single modality models often outperform published baselines that accompany multimodal task datasets, suggesting a need for change in community best practices moving forward. In light of this, we recommend presenting single modality baselines alongside new multimodal models to provide a fair comparison of information gained over dataset biases when considering multimodal input.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Phoebe Mulcaire, Jungo Kasai, Noah A. Smith

      We introduce a method to produce multilingual contextual word representations by training a single language model on text from multiple languages. Our method combines the advantages of contextual word representations with those of multilingual representation learning. We produce language models from dissimilar language pairs (English/Arabic and English/Chinese) and use them in dependency parsing, semantic role labeling, and named entity recognition, with comparisons to monolingual and non-contextual variants. Our results provide further support for polyglot learning, in which representations are shared across multiple languages.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Nelson F. Liu, Matt Gardner, Yonatan Belinkov, Matthew Peters, Noah A. Smith

      Contextual word representations derived from large-scale neural language models are successful across a diverse set of NLP tasks, suggesting that they encode useful and transferable features of language. To shed light on the linguistic knowledge they capture, we study the representations produced by several recent pretrained contextualizers (variants of ELMo, the OpenAI transformer LM, and BERT) with a suite of sixteen diverse probing tasks. We find that linear models trained on top of frozen contextual representations are competitive with state-of-the-art task-specific models in many cases, but fail on tasks requiring fine-grained linguistic knowledge (e.g., conjunct identification). To investigate the transferability of contextual word representations, we quantify differences in the transferability of individual layers within contextualizers, especially between RNNs and transformers. For instance, higher layers of RNNs are more task-specific, while transformer layers do not exhibit the same monotonic trend. In addition, to better understand what makes contextual word representations transferable, we compare language model pretraining with eleven supervised pretraining tasks. For any given task, pretraining on a closely related task yields better performance than language model pretraining (which is better on average) when the pretraining dataset is fixed. However, language model pretraining on more data gives the best results.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Mor Geva, Eric Malmi, Idan Szpektor, Jonathan Berant

      Sentence fusion is the task of joining several independent sentences into a single coherent text. Current datasets for sentence fusion are small and insufficient for training modern neural models. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically-generating fusion examples from raw text and present DISCOFUSE, a large scale dataset for discourse-based sentence fusion. We author a set of rules for identifying a diverse set of discourse phenomena in raw text, and decomposing the text into two independent sentences. We apply our approach on two document collections: Wikipedia and Sports articles, yielding 60 million fusion examples annotated with discourse information required to reconstruct the fused text. We develop a sequence-to-sequence model on DISCOFUSE and thoroughly analyze its strengths and weaknesses with respect to the various discourse phenomena, using both automatic as well as human evaluation. Finally, we conduct transfer learning experiments with WEBSPLIT, a recent dataset for text simplification. We show that pretraining on DISCOFUSE substantially improves performance on WEBSPLIT when viewed as a sentence fusion task.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Guy Tevet, Gavriel Habib, Vered Shwartz, Jonathan Berant

      Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) are a promising approach for text generation that, unlike traditional language models (LM), does not suffer from the problem of “exposure bias”. However, A major hurdle for understanding the potential of GANs for text generation is the lack of a clear evaluation metric. In this work, we propose to approximate the distribution of text generated by a GAN, which permits evaluating them with traditional probability-based LM metrics. We apply our approximation procedure on several GAN-based models and show that they currently perform substantially worse than stateof-the-art LMs. Our evaluation procedure promotes better understanding of the relation between GANs and LMs, and can accelerate progress in GAN-based text generation.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Dor Muhlgay, Jonathan Herzig, Jonathan Berant

      Training models to map natural language instructions to programs given target world supervision only requires searching for good programs at training time. Search is commonly done using beam search in the space of partial programs or program trees, but as the length of the instructions grows finding a good program becomes difficult. In this work, we propose a search algorithm that uses the target world state, known at training time, to train a critic network that predicts the expected reward of every search state. We then score search states on the beam by interpolating their expected reward with the likelihood of programs represented by the search state. Moreover, we search not in the space of programs but in a more compressed state of program executions, augmented with recent entities and actions. On the SCONE dataset, we show that our algorithm dramatically improves performance on all three domains compared to standard beam search and other baselines.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Hila Gonen, Yoav Goldberg

      Word embeddings are widely used in NLP for a vast range of tasks. It was shown that word embeddings derived from text corpora reflect gender biases in society. This phenomenon is pervasive and consistent across different word embedding models, causing serious concern. Several recent works tackle this problem, and propose methods for significantly reducing this gender bias in word embeddings, demonstrating convincing results. However, we argue that this removal is superficial. While the bias is indeed substantially reduced according to the provided bias definition, the actual effect is mostly hiding the bias, not removing it. The gender bias information is still reflected in the distances between “gender-neutralized” words in the debiased embeddings, and can be recovered from them. We present a series of experiments to support this claim, for two debiasing methods. We conclude that existing bias removal techniques are insufficient, and should not be trusted for providing gender-neutral modeling.

      Less More
    • NAACL 2019
      Shauli Ravfogel, Yoav Goldberg, Tal Linzen

      How do typological properties such as word order and morphological case marking affect the ability of neural sequence models to acquire the syntax of a language? Cross-linguistic comparisons of RNNs' syntactic performance (e.g., on subject-verb agreement prediction) are complicated by the fact that any two languages differ in multiple typological properties, as well as by differences in training corpus. We propose a paradigm that addresses these issues: we create synthetic versions of English, which differ from English in a single typological parameter, and generate corpora for those languages based on a parsed English corpus. We report a series of experiments in which RNNs were trained to predict agreement features for verbs in each of those synthetic languages. Among other findings, (1) performance was higher in subject-verb-object order (as in English) than in subject-object-verb order (as in Japanese), suggesting that RNNs have a recency bias; (2) predicting agreement with both subject and object (polypersonal agreement) improves over predicting each separately, suggesting that underlying syntactic knowledge transfers across the two tasks; and (3) overt morphological case makes agreement prediction significantly easier, regardless of word order.

      Less More
    • ICLR 2019
      Hsin-Yuan Huang, Eunsol Choi, Wen-tau Yih

      Conversational machine comprehension requires a deep understanding of the conversation history. To enable traditional, single-turn models to encode the history comprehensively, we introduce Flow, a mechanism that can incorporate intermediate representations generated during the process of answering previous questions, through an alternating parallel processing structure. Compared to shallow approaches that concatenate previous questions/answers as input, Flow integrates the latent semantics of the conversation history more deeply. Our model, FlowQA, shows superior performance on two recently proposed conversational challenges (+7.2% F1 on CoQA and +4.0% on QuAC). The effectiveness of Flow also shows in other tasks. By reducing sequential instruction understanding to conversational machine comprehension, FlowQA outperforms the best models on all three domains in SCONE, with +1.8% to +4.4% improvement in accuracy.

      Less More
    • ICLR 2019
      Alon Jacovi, Guy Hadash, Einat Kermany, Boaz Carmeli, Ofer Lavi, George Kour, Jonathan Berant

      Deep neural networks work well at approximating complicated functions when provided with data and trained by gradient descent methods. At the same time, there is a vast amount of existing functions that programmatically solve different tasks in a precise manner eliminating the need for training. In many cases, it is possible to decompose a task to a series of functions, of which for some we may prefer to use a neural network to learn the functionality, while for others the preferred method would be to use existing black-box functions. We propose a method for end-to-end training of a base neural network that integrates calls to existing black-box functions. We do so by approximating the black-box functionality with a differentiable neural network in a way that drives the base network to comply with the black-box function interface during the end-to-end optimization process. At inference time, we replace the differentiable estimator with its external black-box non-differentiable counterpart such that the base network output matches the input arguments of the black-box function. Using this "Estimate and Replace" paradigm, we train a neural network, end to end, to compute the input to black-box functionality while eliminating the need for intermediate labels. We show that by leveraging the existing precise black-box function during inference, the integrated model generalizes better than a fully differentiable model, and learns more efficiently compared to RL-based methods.

      Less More
    • ICLR 2019
      Wei Yang, Xiaolong Wang, Ali Farhadi, Abhinav Gupta, Roozbeh Mottaghi

      How do humans navigate to target objects in novel scenes? Do we use the semantic/functional priors we have built over years to efficiently search and navigate? For example, to search for mugs, we search cabinets near the coffee machine and for fruits we try the fridge. In this work, we focus on incorporating semantic priors in the task of semantic navigation. We propose to use Graph Convolutional Networks for incorporating the prior knowledge into a deep reinforcement learning framework. The agent uses the features from the knowledge graph to predict the actions. For evaluation, we use the AI2-THOR framework. Our experiments show how semantic knowledge improves performance significantly. More importantly, we show improvement in generalization to unseen scenes and/or objects. The supplementary video can be accessed at the following link: https://youtu.be/otKjuO805dE

      Less More
    • AAAI 2019
      Arindam Mitra, Peter Clark, Oyvind Tafjord, Chitta Baral

      While in recent years machine learning (ML) based approaches have been the popular approach in developing end-to-end question answering systems, such systems often struggle when additional knowledge is needed to correctly answer the questions. Proposed alternatives involve translating the question and the natural language text to a logical representation and then use logical reasoning. However, this alternative falters when the size of the text gets bigger. To address this we propose an approach that does logical reasoning over premises written in natural language text. The proposed method uses recent features of Answer Set Programming (ASP) to call external NLP modules (which may be based on ML) which perform simple textual entailment. To test our approach we develop a corpus based on the life cycle questions and showed that Our system achieves up to 18% performance gain when compared to standard MCQ solvers.

      Less More
    • AAAI 2019
      Oyvind Tafjord, Peter Clark, Matt Gardner, Wen-tau Yih, Ashish Sabharwal

      Many natural language questions require recognizing and reasoning with qualitative relationships (e.g., in science, economics, and medicine), but are challenging to answer with corpus-based methods. Qualitative modeling provides tools that support such reasoning, but the semantic parsing task of mapping questions into those models has formidable challenges. We present QuaRel, a dataset of diverse story questions involving qualitative relationships that characterize these challenges, and techniques that begin to address them. The dataset has 2771 questions relating 19 different types of quantities. For example, "Jenny observes that the robot vacuum cleaner moves slower on the living room carpet than on the bedroom carpet. Which carpet has more friction?" We contribute (1) a simple and flexible conceptual framework for representing these kinds of questions; (2) the QuaRel dataset, including logical forms, exemplifying the parsing challenges; and (3) two novel models for this task, built as extensions of type-constrained semantic parsing. The first of these models (called QuaSP+) significantly outperforms off-the-shelf tools on QuaRel. The second (QuaSP+Zero) demonstrates zero-shot capability, i.e., the ability to handle new qualitative relationships without requiring additional training data, something not possible with previous models. This work thus makes inroads into answering complex, qualitative questions that require reasoning, and scaling to new relationships at low cost. The dataset and models are available at this http URL.

      Less More
    • AAAI 2019
      Maarten Sap, Ronan LeBras, Emily Allaway, Chandra Bhagavatula, Nicholas Lourie, Hannah Rashkin, Brendan Roof, Noah A. Smith, Yejin Choi

      We present ATOMIC, an atlas of everyday commonsense reasoning, organized through 877k textual descriptions of inferential knowledge. Compared to existing resources that center around taxonomic knowledge, ATOMIC focuses on inferential knowledge organized as typed if-then relations with variables (e.g., "if X pays Y a compliment, then Y will likely return the compliment"). We propose nine if-then relation types to distinguish causes vs. effects, agents vs. themes, voluntary vs. involuntary events, and actions vs. mental states. By generatively training on the rich inferential knowledge described in ATOMIC, we show that neural models can acquire simple commonsense capabilities and reason about previously unseen events. Experimental results demonstrate that multitask models that incorporate the hierarchical structure of if-then relation types lead to more accurate inference compared to models trained in isolation, as measured by both automatic and human evaluation.

      Less More
    • arXiv 2019
      Daniel Khashabi, Erfan Sadeqi Azer, Tushar Khot, Ashish Sabharwal, Dan Roth

      Recent systems for natural language understanding are strong at overcoming linguistic variability for lookup style reasoning. Yet, their accuracy drops dramatically as the number of reasoning steps increases. We present the first formal framework to study such empirical observations, addressing the ambiguity, redundancy, incompleteness, and inaccuracy that the use of language introduces when representing a hidden conceptual space. Our formal model uses two interrelated spaces: a conceptual "meaning space" that is unambiguous and complete but hidden, and a linguistic "symbol space" that captures a noisy grounding of the meaning space in the symbols or words of a language. We apply this framework to study the "connectivity problem" in undirected graphs -- a core reasoning problem that forms the basis for more complex multi-hop reasoning. We show that it is indeed possible to construct a high-quality algorithm for detecting connectivity in the (latent) meaning graph, based on an observed noisy symbol graph, as long as the noise is below our quantified noise level and only a few hops are needed. On the other hand, we also prove an impossibility result: if a query requires a large number (specifically, logarithmic in the size of the meaning graph) of hops, no reasoning system operating over the symbol graph is likely to recover any useful property of the meaning graph. This highlights a fundamental barrier for a class of reasoning problems and systems, and suggests the need to limit the distance between the two spaces, rather than investing in multi-hop reasoning with "many" hops.

      Less More