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Papers

  • Ashish Sabharwal, Yexiang Xue UAI 2018 2018

    We propose a new algorithm for computing a constant-factor approximation of precision- recall (PR) curves for massive noisy datasets produced by generative models. Assessing va- lidity of items in such datasets requires human annotation, which is costly and must be mini- mized. Our algorithm, ADASTRAT, is the first data-aware method for this task. It chooses the next point to query on the PR curve adaptively, based on previous observations. It then selects specific items to annotate using stratified sam- pling. Under a mild monotonicity assumption, ADASTRAT outputs a guaranteed approxima- tion of the underlying precision function, while using a number of annotations that scales very slowly with N, the dataset size. For exam- ple, when the minimum precision is bounded by a constant, it issues only log log N preci- sion queries. In general, it has a regret of no more than loglogN w.r.t. an oracle that is- sues queries at data-dependent (unknown) op- timal points. On a scaled-up NLP dataset of 3.5M items, ADASTRAT achieves a remark- ably close approximation of the true precision function using only 18 precision queries, 13x fewer than best previous approaches.

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  • Sergey Feldman, Kyle Lo, Waleed Ammar ArXiv 2018

    We explore the degree to which papers prepublished on arXiv garner more citations, in an attempt to paint a sharper picture of fairness issues related to prepublishing. A paper’s citation count is estimated using a negative-binomial generalized linear model (GLM) while observing a binary variable which indicates whether the paper has been prepublished. We control for author influence (via the authors’ h-index at the time of paper writing), publication venue, and overall time that paper has been available on arXiv. Our analysis only includes papers that were eventually accepted for publication at top-tier CS conferences, and were posted on arXiv either before or after the acceptance notification. We observe that papers submitted to arXiv before acceptance have, on average, 65% more citations in the following year compared to papers submitted after. We note that this finding is not causal, and discuss possible next steps.

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  • Waleed Ammar, Dirk Groeneveld, Chandra Bhagavatula, Iz Beltagy, Miles Crawford, Doug Downey, Jason Dunkelberger, Ahmed Elgohary, Sergey Feldman, Vu Ha, Rodney Kinney, Sebastian Kohlmeier, Kyle Lo, Tyler Murray, Hsu-Han Ooi, Matthew E. Peters, et al. NAACL-HLT 2018

    We describe a deployed scalable system for organizing published scientific literature into a heterogeneous graph to facilitate algorithmic manipulation and discovery. The resulting literature graph consists of more than 280M nodes, representing papers, authors, entities and various interactions between them (e.g., authorships, citations, entity mentions). We reduce literature graph construction into familiar NLP tasks (e.g., entity extraction and linking), point out research challenges due to differences from standard formulations of these tasks, and report empirical results for each task. The methods described in this paper are used to enable semantic features in www.semanticscholar.org.

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  • Jonathan Kuck, Ashish Sabharwal, and Stefano Ermon AAAI 2018

    Rademacher complexity is often used to characterize the learnability of a hypothesis class and is known to be related to the class size. We leverage this observation and introduce a new technique for estimating the size of an arbitrary weighted set, defined as the sum of weights of all elements in the set. Our technique provides upper and lower bounds on a novel generalization of Rademacher complexity to the weighted setting in terms of the weighted set size. This generalizes Massart's Lemma, a known upper bound on the Rademacher complexity in terms of the unweighted set size.We show that the weighted Rademacher complexity can be estimated by solving a randomly perturbed optimization problem, allowing us to derive high-probability bounds on the size of any weighted set. We apply our method to the problems of calculating the partition function of an Ising model and computing propositional model counts (#SAT). Our experiments demonstrate that we can produce tighter bounds than competing methods in both the weighted and unweighted settings.

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  • Tushar Khot, Ashish Sabharwal, and Peter Clark AAAI 2018

    We present a new dataset and model for textual entailment, derived from treating multiple-choice question-answering as an entailment problem. SCITAIL is the first entailment set that is created solely from natural sentences that already exist independently "in the wild" rather than sentences authored specifically for the entailment task. Different from existing entailment datasets, we create hypotheses from science questions and the corresponding answer candidates, and premises from relevant web sentences retrieved from a large corpus. These sentences are often linguistically challenging. This, combined with the high lexical similarity of premise and hypothesis for both entailed and non-entailed pairs, makes this new entailment task particularly difficult. The resulting challenge is evidenced by state-of-the-art textual entailment systems achieving mediocre performance on SCITAIL, especially in comparison to a simple majority class baseline. As a step forward, we demonstrate that one can improve accuracy on SCITAIL by 5% using a new neural model that exploits linguistic structure.

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  • Daniel Khashabi, Tushar Khot, Ashish Sabharwal, and Dan Roth AAAI 2018

    We propose a novel method for exploiting the semantic structure of text to answer multiple-choice questions. The approach is especially suitable for domains that require reasoning over a diverse set of linguistic constructs but have limited training data. To address these challenges, we present the first system, to the best of our knowledge, that reasons over a wide range of semantic abstractions of the text, which are derived using off-the-shelf, general-purpose, pre-trained natural language modules such as semantic role labelers, coreference resolvers, and dependency parsers. Representing multiple abstractions as a family of graphs, we translate question answering (QA) into a search for an optimal subgraph that satisfies certain global and local properties. This formulation generalizes several prior structured QA systems. Our system, SEMANTICILP, demonstrates strong performance on two domains simultaneously. In particular, on a collection of challenging science QA datasets, it outperforms various state-ofthe- art approaches, including neural models, broad coverage information retrieval, and specialized techniques using structured knowledge bases, by 2%-6%.

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  • Matthew E. Peters, Mark Neumann, Mohit Iyyer, Matt Gardner, Christopher Clark, Kenton Lee, Luke Zettlemoyer NAACL 2018

    We introduce a new type of deep contextualized word representation that models both (1) complex characteristics of word use (e.g., syntax and semantics), and (2) how these uses vary across linguistic contexts (i.e., to model polysemy). Our word vectors are learned functions of the internal states of a deep bidirectional language model (biLM), which is pre-trained on a large text corpus. We show that these representations can be easily added to existing models and significantly improve the state of the art across six challenging NLP problems, including question answering, textual entailment and sentiment analysis. We also present an analysis showing that exposing the deep internals of the pre-trained network is crucial, allowing downstream models to mix different types of semi-supervision signals.

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  • Chandra Bhagavatula, Sergey Feldman, Russell Power, Waleed Ammar NAACL HLT 2018

    We present a content-based method for recommending citations in an academic paper draft. We embed a given query document into a vector space, then use its nearest neighbors as candidates, and rerank the candidates using a discriminative model trained to distinguish between observed and unobserved citations. Unlike previous work, our method does not require metadata such as author names which can be missing, e.g., during the peer review process. Without using metadata, our method outperforms the best reported results on PubMed and DBLP datasets with relative improvements of over 18% in F1@20 and over 22% in MRR. We show empirically that, although adding metadata improves the performance on standard metrics, it favors self-citations which are less useful in a citation rec- ommendation setup. We release an online portal for citation recommendation based on our method, and a new dataset OpenCorpus of 7 million research articles to facilitate future research on this task.

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  • Suchin Gururangan, Swabha Swayamdipta, Omer Levy, Roy Schwartz, Sam Bowman and Noah A. Smith NAACL 2018

    Large-scale datasets for natural language inference are created by presenting crowd workers with a sentence (premise), and asking them to generate three new sentences (hypotheses) that it entails, contradicts, or is logically neutral with respect to. We show that, in a significant portion of such data, this protocol leaves clues that make it possible to identify the label by looking only at the hypothesis, without observing the premise. Specifically, we show that a simple text categorization model can correctly classify the hypothesis alone in about 67% of SNLI (Bowman et al., 2015) and 53% of MultiNLI (Williams et al., 2018). Our analysis reveals that specific linguistic phenomena such as negation and vagueness are highly correlated with certain inference classes. Our findings suggest that the success of natural language inference models to date has been overestimated, and that the task remains a hard open problem.

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  • Niket Tandon, Aparna S. Varde, Gerard de Melo SIGMOD Records 2018

    There is growing conviction that the future of computing depends on our ability to exploit big data on theWeb to enhance intelligent systems. This includes encyclopedic knowledge for factual details, common sense for human-like reasoning and natural language generation for smarter communication. With recent chatbots conceivably at the verge of passing the Turing Test, there are calls for more common sense oriented alternatives, e.g., the Winograd Schema Challenge. The Aristo QA system demonstrates the lack of common sense in current systems in answering fourth-grade science exam questions. On the language generation front, despite the progress in deep learning, current models are easily confused by subtle distinctions that may require linguistic common sense, e.g.quick food vs. fast food. These issues bear on tasks such as machine translation and should be addressed using common sense acquired from text. Mining common sense from massive amounts of data and applying it in intelligent systems, in several respects, appears to be the next frontier in computing. Our brief overview of the state of Commonsense Knowledge (CSK) in Machine Intelligence provides insights into CSK acquisition, CSK in natural language, applications of CSK and discussion of open issues. This paper provides a report of a tutorial at a recent conference with a brief survey of topics.

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  • Peter Clark, Isaac Cowhey, Oren Etzioni, Tushar Khot, Ashish Sabharwal, Carissa Schoenick, Oyvind Tafjord arXiv 2018

    We present a new question set, text corpus, and baselines assembled to encourage AI research in advanced question answering. Together, these constitute the AI2 Reasoning Challenge (ARC), which requires far more powerful knowledge and reasoning than previous challenges such as SQuAD or SNLI. The ARC question set is partitioned into a Challenge Set and an Easy Set, where the Challenge Set contains only questions answered incorrectly by both a retrieval-based algorithm and a word co-occurence algorithm. The dataset contains only natural, grade-school science questions (authored for human tests), and is the largest public-domain set of this kind (7,787 questions). We test several baselines on the Challenge Set, including leading neural models from the SQuAD and SNLI tasks, and find that none are able to significantly outperform a random baseline, reflecting the difficult nature of this task. We are also releasing the ARC Corpus, a corpus of 14M science sentences relevant to the task, and implementations of the three neural baseline models tested. Can your model perform better? We pose ARC as a challenge to the community.

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  • Bhavana Dalvi, Lifu Huang, Niket Tandon, Scott Wen-tau Yih, Peter Clark NAACL 2018

    We present a new dataset and models for comprehending paragraphs about processes (e.g., photosynthesis), an important genre of text describing a dynamic world. The new dataset, ProPara, is the first to contain natural (rather than machine-generated) text about a changing world along with a full annotation of entity states (location and existence) during those changes (81k datapoints). The end-task, tracking the location and existence of entities through the text, is challenging because the causal effects of actions are often implicit and need to be inferred. We find that previous models that have worked well on synthetic data achieve only mediocre performance on ProPara, and introduce two new neural models that exploit alternative mechanisms for state prediction, in particular using LSTM input encoding and span prediction. The new models improve accuracy by up to 19%. The dataset and models are available to the community.

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  • Peter Clark, Bhavana Dalvi, Niket Tandon arXiv 2018

    Our goal is to answer questions about paragraphs describing processes (e.g., photosynthesis). Texts of this genre are challenging because the effects of actions are often implicit (unstated), requiring background knowledge and inference to reason about the changing world states. To supply this knowledge, we leverage Verb-Net to build a rulebase (called the Semantic Lexicon) of the preconditions and effects of actions, and use it along with commonsense knowledge of persistence to answer questions about change. Our evaluation shows that our system PROCOMP significantly outperforms two strong reading comprehension (RC) baselines. Our contributions are two-fold: the Semantic Lexicon rulebase itself, and a demonstration of how a simulation-based approach to machine reading can outperform RC methods that rely on surface cues alone. Since this work was performed, we have developed neural systems that outperform PROCOMP, described elsewhere (Dalvi et al., 2018). However, the Semantic Lexicon remains a novel and potentially useful resource, and its integration with neural systems remains a currently unexplored opportunity for further improvements in machine reading about processes.

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  • Matt Gardner, Joel Grus, Mark Neumann, Oyvind Tafjord, Pradeep Dasigi, Nelson Liu, Matthew Peters, Michael Schmitz, Luke Zettlemoyer arXiv 2018

    This paper describes AllenNLP, a platform for research on deep learning methods in natural language understanding. AllenNLP is designed to support researchers who want to build novel language understanding models quickly and easily. It is built on top of PyTorch, allowing for dynamic computation graphs, and provides (1) a flexible data API that handles intelligent batching and padding, (2) high level abstractions for common operations in working with text, and (3) a modular and extensible experiment framework that makes doing good science easy. It also includes reference implementations of high quality approaches for both core semantic problems (e.g. semantic role labeling (Palmer et al., 2005)) and language understanding applications (e.g. machine comprehension (Rajpurkar et al., 2016)). AllenNLP is an ongoing open-source effort maintained by engineers and researchers at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence.

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  • Dongyeop Kang, Waleed Ammar, Bhavana Dalvi Mishra, Madeleine van Zuylen, Sebastian Kohlmeier, Eduard Hovy, Roy Schwartz NAACL HLT 2018 Dataset

    Peer reviewing is a central component in the scientific publishing process. We present the first public dataset of scientific peer reviews available for research pur- poses (PeerRead v1), providing an opportunity to study this important artifact. The dataset consists of 14.7K paper drafts and the corresponding accept/reject decisions in top-tier venues including ACL, NIPS and ICLR. The dataset also includes 10.7K textual peer reviews written by experts for a subset of the papers. We describe the data collection process and report interesting observed phenomena in the peer reviews. We also propose two novel NLP tasks based on this dataset and provide simple baseline models. In the first task, we show that simple models can predict whether a paper is accepted with up to 21% error reduction compared to the majority baseline. In the second task, we predict the numerical scores of review aspects and show that simple models can outperform the mean baseline for aspects with high variance such as 'originality' and 'impact'.

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  • Roy Schwartz, Sam Thomson and Noah A. Smith ACL 2018

    Recurrent and convolutional neural networks comprise two distinct families of models that have proven to be useful for encoding natural language utterances. In this paper we present SoPa, a new model that aims to bridge these two approaches. SoPa combines neural representation learning with weighted finite-state automata (WFSAs) to learn a soft version of traditional surface patterns. We show that SoPa is an extension of a one-layer CNN, and that such CNNs are equivalent to a restricted version of SoPa, and accordingly, to a restricted form of WFSA. Empirically, on three text classification tasks, SoPa is comparable or better than both a BiLSTM (RNN) baseline and a CNN baseline, and is particularly useful in small data settings.

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  • Vidur Joshi, Matthew Peters, and Mark Hopkins ACL 2018

    We revisit domain adaptation for parsers in the neural era. First we show that recent advances in word representations greatly diminish the need for domain adaptation when the target domain is syntactically similar to the source domain. As evidence, we train a parser on the Wall Street Jour- nal alone that achieves over 90% F1 on the Brown corpus. For more syntactically distant domains, we provide a simple way to adapt a parser using only dozens of partial annotations. For instance, we increase the percentage of error-free geometry-domain parses in a held-out set from 45% to 73% using approximately five dozen training examples. In the process, we demonstrate a new state-of-the-art single model result on the Wall Street Journal test set of 94.3%. This is an absolute increase of 1.7% over the previous state-of-the-art of 92.6%.

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  • Nelson F. Liu, Omer Levy, Roy Schwartz, Chenhao Tan, Noah A. Smith RepL4NLP 2018

    While recurrent neural networks have found success in a variety of natural language processing applications, they are general models of sequential data. We investigate how the properties of natural language data affect an LSTM's ability to learn a nonlinguistic task: recalling elements from its input. We find that models trained on natural language data are able to recall tokens from much longer sequences than models trained on non-language sequential data. Furthermore, we show that the LSTM learns to solve the memorization task by explicitly using a subset of its neurons to count timesteps in the input. We hypothesize that the patterns and structure in natural language data enable LSTMs to learn by providing approximate ways of reducing loss, but understanding the effect of different training data on the learnability of LSTMs remains an open question.

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  • Daniel Gordon, Aniruddha Kembhavi, Mohammad Rastegari, Joseph Redmon, Dieter Fox, Ali Farhadi CVPR 2018 Video

    We introduce Interactive Question Answering (IQA), the task of answering questions that require an autonomous agent to interact with a dynamic visual environment. IQA presents the agent with a scene and a question, like: “Are there any apples in the fridge?” The agent must navigate around the scene, acquire visual understanding of scene elements, interact with objects (e.g. open refrigerators) and plan for a series of actions conditioned on the question. Popular reinforcement learning approaches with a single controller perform poorly on IQA owing to the large and diverse state space. We propose the Hierarchical Interactive Memory Network (HIMN), consisting of a factorized set of controllers, allowing the system to operate at multiple levels of temporal abstraction, reducing the diversity of the action space available to each controller and enabling an easier training paradigm. We introduce IQADATA, a new Interactive Question Answering dataset built upon AI2-THOR, a simulated photo-realistic environment of configurable indoor scenes [95] with interactive objects. IQADATA has 75,000 questions, each paired with a unique scene configuration. Our experiments show that our proposed model outperforms popular single controller based methods on IQADATA. For sample questions and results, please view our video.

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  • Jonghyun Choi, Jayant Krishnamurthy, Aniruddha Kembhavi, Ali Farhadi CVPR 2018

    Diagrams often depict complex phenomena and serve as a good test bed for visual and textual reasoning. However, understanding diagrams using natural image understanding approaches requires large training datasets of diagrams, which are very hard to obtain. Instead, this can be addressed as a matching problem either between labeled diagrams, images or both. This problem is very challenging since the absence of significant color and texture renders local cues ambiguous and requires global reasoning. We consider the problem of one-shot part labeling: labeling multiple parts of an object in a target image given only a single source image of that category. For this set-to-set matching problem, we introduce the Structured Set Matching Network (SSMN), a structured prediction model that incorporates convolutional neural networks. The SSMN is trained using global normalization to maximize local match scores between corresponding elements and a global consistency score among all matched elements, while also enforcing a matching constraint between the two sets. The SSMN significantly outperforms several strong baselines on three label transfer scenarios: diagram-to-diagram, evaluated on a new diagram dataset of over 200 categories; image-toimage, evaluated on a dataset built on top of the Pascal Part Dataset; and image-to-diagram, evaluated on transferring labels across these datasets.

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