Papers

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AllenNLP
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Viewing 1-10 of 100 papers
  • Formalizing Trust in Artificial Intelligence: Prerequisites, Causes and Goals of Human Trust in AI

    Alon Jacovi, Ana Marasović, Tim Miller, Yoav GoldbergFAccT2021
    Trust is a central component of the interaction between people and AI, in that 'incorrect' levels of trust may cause misuse, abuse or disuse of the technology. But what, precisely, is the nature of trust in AI? What are the prerequisites and goals of the cognitive mechanism of trust, and how can we cause these prerequisites and goals, or assess whether they are being satisfied in a given interaction? This work aims to answer these questions. We discuss a model of trust inspired by, but not identical to, sociology's interpersonal trust (i.e., trust between people). This model rests on two key properties of the vulnerability of the user and the ability to anticipate the impact of the AI model's decisions. We incorporate a formalization of 'contractual trust', such that trust between a user and an AI is trust that some implicit or explicit contract will hold, and a formalization of 'trustworthiness' (which detaches from the notion of trustworthiness in sociology), and with it concepts of 'warranted' and 'unwarranted' trust. We then present the possible causes of warranted trust as intrinsic reasoning and extrinsic behavior, and discuss how to design trustworthy AI, how to evaluate whether trust has manifested, and whether it is warranted. Finally, we elucidate the connection between trust and XAI using our formalization.
  • Promoting Graph Awareness in Linearized Graph-to-Text Generation

    Alexander M. Hoyle, Ana Marasović, Noah A. SmitharXiv2020
    Generating text from structured inputs, such as meaning representations or RDF triples, has often involved the use of specialized graphencoding neural networks. However, recent applications of pretrained transformers to linearizations of graph inputs have yielded stateof-the-art generation results on graph-to-text tasks. Here, we explore the ability of these linearized models to encode local graph structures, in particular their invariance to the graph linearization strategy and their ability to reconstruct corrupted inputs. Our findings motivate solutions to enrich the quality of models’ implicit graph encodings via scaffolding. Namely, we use graph-denoising objectives implemented in a multi-task text-to-text framework. We find that these denoising scaffolds lead to substantial improvements in downstream generation in low-resource settings.
  • Explaining NLP Models via Minimal Contrastive Editing (MiCE)

    Alexis Ross, Ana Marasović, Matthew E. PetersarXiv2020
    Humans give contrastive explanations that explain why an observed event happened rather than some other counterfactual event (the contrast case). Despite the important role that contrastivity plays in how people generate and evaluate explanations, this property is largely missing from current methods for explaining NLP models. We present MINIMAL CONTRASTIVE EDITING (MICE), a method for generating contrastive explanations of model predictions in the form of edits to inputs that change model outputs to the contrast case. Our experiments across three tasks—binary sentiment classification, topic classification, and multiplechoice question answering—show that MICE is able to produce edits that are not only contrastive, but also minimal and fluent, consistent with human contrastive edits. We demonstrate how MICE edits can be used for two use cases in NLP system development— uncovering dataset artifacts and debugging incorrect model predictions—and thereby illustrate that generating contrastive explanations is a promising research direction for model interpretability.
  • Easy, Reproducible and Quality-Controlled Data Collection with Crowdaq

    Qiang Ning, Hao Wu, Pradeep Dasigi, Dheeru Dua, Matt Gardner, IV RobertL.Logan, Ana Marasović, Z. NieEMNLP • Demo2020
    High-quality and large-scale data are key to success for AI systems. However, large-scale data annotation efforts are often confronted with a set of common challenges: (1) designing a user-friendly annotation interface; (2) training enough annotators efficiently; and (3) reproducibility. To address these problems, we introduce Crowdaq, an open-source platform that standardizes the data collection pipeline with customizable user-interface components, automated annotator qualification, and saved pipelines in a re-usable format. We show that Crowdaq simplifies data annotation significantly on a diverse set of data collection use cases and we hope it will be a convenient tool for the community.
  • Grounded Compositional Outputs for Adaptive Language Modeling

    Nikolaos Pappas, Phoebe Mulcaire, Noah A. SmithEMNLP2020
    Language models have emerged as a central component across NLP, and a great deal of progress depends on the ability to cheaply adapt them (e.g., through finetuning) to new domains and tasks. A language model's vocabulary---typically selected before training and permanently fixed later---affects its size and is part of what makes it resistant to such adaptation. Prior work has used compositional input embeddings based on surface forms to ameliorate this issue. In this work, we go one step beyond and propose a fully compositional output embedding layer for language models, which is further grounded in information from a structured lexicon (WordNet), namely semantically related words and free-text definitions. To our knowledge, the result is the first word-level language model with a size that does not depend on the training vocabulary. We evaluate the model on conventional language modeling as well as challenging cross-domain settings with an open vocabulary, finding that it matches or outperforms previous state-of-the-art output embedding methods and adaptation approaches. Our analysis attributes the improvements to sample efficiency: our model is more accurate for low-frequency words.
  • IIRC: A Dataset of Incomplete Information Reading Comprehension Questions

    James Ferguson, Matt Gardner. Hannaneh Hajishirzi, Tushar Khot, Pradeep DasigiEMNLP2020
    Humans often have to read multiple documents to address their information needs. However, most existing reading comprehension (RC) tasks only focus on questions for which the contexts provide all the information required to answer them, thus not evaluating a system’s performance at identifying a potential lack of sufficient information and locating sources for that information. To fill this gap, we present a dataset, IIRC, with more than 13K questions over paragraphs from English Wikipedia that provide only partial information to answer them, with the missing information occurring in one or more linked documents. The questions were written by crowd workers who did not have access to any of the linked documents, leading to questions that have little lexical overlap with the contexts where the answers appear. This process also gave many questions without answers, and those that require discrete reasoning, increasing the difficulty of the task. We follow recent modeling work on various reading comprehension datasets to construct a baseline model for this dataset, finding that it achieves 31.1% F1 on this task, while estimated human performance is 88.4%. The dataset, code for the baseline system, and a leaderboard can be found at https://allennlp.org/iirc.
  • Improving Compositional Generalization in Semantic Parsing

    Inbar Oren, Jonathan Herzig, Nitish Gupta, Matt Gardner, Jonathan BerantFindings of EMNLP2020
    Generalization of models to out-of-distribution (OOD) data has captured tremendous attention recently. Specifically, compositional generalization, i.e., whether a model generalizes to new structures built of components observed during training, has sparked substantial interest. In this work, we investigate compositional generalization in semantic parsing, a natural test-bed for compositional generalization, as output programs are constructed from sub-components. We analyze a wide variety of models and propose multiple extensions to the attention module of the semantic parser, aiming to improve compositional generalization. We find that the following factors improve compositional generalization: (a) using contextual representations, such as ELMo and BERT, (b) informing the decoder what input tokens have previously been attended to, (c) training the decoder attention to agree with pre-computed token alignments, and (d) downsampling examples corresponding to frequent program templates. While we substantially reduce the gap between in-distribution and OOD generalization, performance on OOD compositions is still substantially lower.
  • Learning from Task Descriptions

    Orion Weller, Nick Lourie, Matt Gardner, Matthew PetersEMNLP2020
  • MedICaT: A Dataset of Medical Images, Captions, and Textual References

    Sanjay Subramanian, Lucy Lu Wang, Sachin Mehta, Ben Bogin, Madeleine van Zuylen, Sravanthi Parasa, Sameer Singh, Matt Gardner, Hannaneh HajishirziFindings of EMNLP2020
    Understanding the relationship between figures and text is key to scientific document understanding. Medical figures in particular are quite complex, often consisting of several subfigures (75% of figures in our dataset), with detailed text describing their content. Previous work studying figures in scientific papers focused on classifying figure content rather than understanding how images relate to the text. To address challenges in figure retrieval and figure-to-text alignment, we introduce MedICaT, a dataset of medical images in context. MedICaT consists of 217K images from 131K open access biomedical papers, and includes captions, inline references for 74% of figures, and manually annotated subfigures and subcaptions for a subset of figures. Using MedICaT, we introduce the task of subfigure to subcaption alignment in compound figures and demonstrate the utility of inline references in image-text matching. Our data and code can be accessed at https://github.com/allenai/medicat
  • MOCHA: A Dataset for Training and Evaluating Generative Reading Comprehension Metrics

    Anthony Chen, Gabriel Stanovsky, S. Singh, Matt GardnerEMNLP2020
    Posing reading comprehension as a generation problem provides a great deal of flexibility, allowing for open-ended questions with few restrictions on possible answers. However, progress is impeded by existing generation metrics, which rely on token overlap and are agnostic to the nuances of reading comprehension. To address this, we introduce a benchmark for training and evaluating generative reading comprehension metrics: MOdeling Correctness with Human Annotations. MOCHA contains 40K human judgement scores on model outputs from 6 diverse question answering datasets and an additional set of minimal pairs for evaluation. Using MOCHA, we train a Learned Evaluation metric for Reading Comprehension, LERC, to mimic human judgement scores. LERC outperforms baseline metrics by 10 to 36 absolute Pearson points on held-out annotations. When we evaluate robustness on minimal pairs, LERC achieves 80% accuracy, outperforming baselines by 14 to 26 absolute percentage points while leaving significant room for improvement. MOCHA presents a challenging problem for developing accurate and robust generative reading comprehension metrics.
AllenNLP
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